Learn to “Quilt As You Go” with this Gorgeous Christmas Runner

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Sign up for this class at Quilty Pleasures – Simi Valley –  It is sceduled for Saturday November 2 from 10 AM until 4 PM.

You will make a beautiful piece of Home Decor to use as a table or mantel runner.  It is shown here in festive holiday colors but can be made in the fabric of your choice.

“Quilt As You Go”  so that when you have finished adding the last border you are finished!  Quilting has already been done.

This is going to be a fun class so go ahead and call the shop today to reserve your spot.

805-581-1577     1742 E. Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley

Tutorial for Sun Printing (Sun Painting)

A while back I promised a tutorial on Sun Printing.  Now that Spring is well underway  and the Sun has returned for a lot of us – it’s Time!

Materials you will need:

  • Fabric – 100% cotton – preferably white – prewashed in detergent and dried

            Cut fabric to 15 inches by 15 inches

  • Plastic sheet – to protect work surface
  • Clothes you don’t mind getting paint on
  • A piece of heavy cardboard covered with plastic to use as your portable work surface.  It should be a couple of inches larger than your fabric piece all around.
  • Duct tape to secure plastic
  • Straight pins

    Prepared work surface and wet fabric

    Prepared work surface and wet fabric

  • Paint:  sun sensitive fabric paint such as Dye-Na-Flow (from Lumiere) or light sensitive Setacolor fabric paint
  • Foam brushes ½ inch to 1 ½ inch
  • Plastic bowls (one for each color that you will use – recommend 1 to 3 for your first project)
  • Spritzer bottle with water

Masking Items:

These are the items that you will use to create your design.  They can be almost anything that will lay flat on the fabric and create a shape. 

Found items such as old keys, coins of various sizes, buttons, safety pins, string of beads.

Hardware items such as washers, nuts and bolts, various size screws

Natural items:  fronds, leaves, petals

Stencils (for reverse pattern)

Cut out shapes

A variety of objects can be used to mask areas of your painted surface and produce your print

A variety of objects can be used to mask areas of your painted surface and produce your print

Steps

  1. Secure your fabric to work board with pins.  I occasionally will use masking tape on the edges instead.
  2. Wet down fabric thoroughly with water/spritzer bottle
  3. Select paint colors, mix a small amount of each color with 2 parts water: one color per bowl    supplies
  4. Wet foam brush and start painting fabric.  Remember this is a background.  It doesn’t have to resemble anything; it is simply a colorful backdrop for your printing items.  While painting with color #1, leave white spaces for additional colors.
  5. As you add your additional colors, spritz more water to help the colors spread and mix at the edges.
  6. Have your masking items ready to arrange on your fabric immediately, especially if you are outside on a warm sunny day!

Fresh leaves from a rose bush are arranged on the wet painted surface of the fabric

7.  Quickly arrange masking items (see above – rose bush leafs)  on to wet painted surface of fabric.

8.  Take fabric – along with work surface to a sunny spot and allow to dry for 30 minutes to an hour – depending on temperature and humidity.

9.  Remove masks when completely dry. 

10.  Press fabric with a hot dry iron for about 4 minutes to set the paint.

The results

The results

More Rose Leafs - different color scheme

More Rose Leafs – different color scheme

Printed with a variety of hardware

Printed with a variety of hardware

New Life for An Old Bag

Several years ago I sewed a tote  bag that quickly became my favorite.  I enjoyed it  so much that I actually started wearing it out!

When It Was New

well worn

Tossing it aside was not an option. Too much work went into making it and besides I really liked it.

So, I investigated ways to ‘fix’ it that would not be too difficult and would not look like an emergency patching job.

I decided to use fake prairie points with a ragged edge.  Luckily I had enough fabric left over from the bag in my scrap stash.So I cut out about 20   3 in. by 3 in. squares, folded them in half corner to corner, then arranged them in overlapping fashion around the top edge of the tote. 

3 inch by 3 inch squares – fold each in half, point to point

I stitched around the top to hold them in place then stitched them more securely about 1/2 inch in from the edges to leave them “raw-edged.”  Finally I washed and dried the tote bag to allow the new embellishments to fray a little.  Because the fabric had been previously washed it did not do much fraying but I’m sure that in time they’ll take on that look.

And here is my “new” old tote bag ready to go !

D is For Do-Over

There aren’t too many things in this life that we can ‘do over.’  It’s not like a computer game where we can push the restart button and proceed; this time, of course, knowing the pitfalls and the previous mistakes that we made

In this case my Do-Over is of something of relative inconsequence.

This past January I made a small art quilt to go along with our Haiku prompt “Exhilaration”.  I was pleased with some aspects of my quilt.  For instance, I thought the quilting was terrific (even if I do say so myself, lol), there was considerable texture (I had experimented with light molding paste) and the colors were bold and beautiful.

But the composition was awful to my critical eye and I wasn’t happy with it.

Here’s the original:

Original Exhilaration Quilt

See what I mean?

So here’s what I did.

I needed to break up the huge expanse of yellow and somehow integrate the various elements.  So I painted some fusible web, cut it out, burned the edges with my multi heat tool and applied some of it to the quilt.

Then I printed the Haiku on Extravorganza, fringed the edges and painted them. Then affixed the Haiku to the quilt with BoNash.

Here’s my do-over.  Please let me know what you think?  How would you have proceeded?  I’m really interested in your comments.

Exhilaration The Re-Do

Fish Out of Water

When I posted here several months ago I mentioned that I was working on a piece that needed some hand embroidery to be added.  This was a fun project – something different and incorporating several different techniques.

Here is a photo of  my Fish Out Of Water

And here is an overview of how I made him.

I collaged several fabrics onto a mottled yellow background.  I made a stencil from a fish drawing and when I cut it out I was careful to keep the remaining stencil material intact so that I could use it too.
Then I painted the fish image onto the quilt using the stencil and acrylic paint.  When it was dry I thought that more contrast was needed around the fish so I used the “fish” part of the stencil and painted around the outline.

I outlined the collage pieces with perle cotton and added embroidery to the fish.  Then I added some beads and a button eye to accent the fish.

Outline Stitching and Button Eye

Beaded Tail

Finally I stitched and beaded a spray of coral.

Beaded Spray of Coral

I used a pillowcase type of backing and accented the edges with a perle cotton running stitch.

Demystifying Stamp Pads

 I’ve been using Ink Stamp Pads forever. Remember as kids when you’d get hold of an old stamp and stamp pad and brand everything in sight including the back of your hands?

Many years later I tackled scrap-booking then journaling – again making use of those tempting rubber stamps and lovely inky pads. In those days it was pretty straightforward. If the color called my name I used the pad and didn’t care if it was Dye Ink, Pigment Ink, Solvent, Archival, or whatever.

Now with art quilting there’s more to the selection and more risk in selecting the wrong type of pad. It’s got to transfer cleanly to a very porous surface. And of course you don’t want fading.

You may also be concerned about the image staying put AND crisp and clear after washing or if you’re planning to use wet media over the image. I have NOT included the effects of washing on these samples and will do something on that another time.

Oh I got so confused!!!  Everywhere you look – known and trusted online sites/blogs, manufacturers’ sites or craft shop advice sites you get someone else’s opinion. And often these opinions are at odds with one another.

So I decided to take matters into my own hands and go back into my mad scientist mode. I lined up ALL the different types of ink stamp pads that I had on hand, chose a rubber stamp that would print well (not too much detail and deeply carved stamp ridges) on fabric and went to work.

1. I washed, dried and pressed the fabric first: some bleached muslin. (you’ll get a slightly different color cast using the unbleached.)

2. One by one I inked up the stamps, stamped the fabric, and recorded what was used.

3. In a couple of instances I also documented the Surface that I stamped on to see if that made a significant difference. For instance whether it was a hard surface or a cushiony one – including batting.

4. After making sure all impressions were completely dry I pressed with a hot iron.

NOTE: Because I’m going to be using these in Art Quilts I did not wash the fabric again after stamping it. So this is NOT a test for washability, simply a comparison of how well the inks did visually on the fabric. I was looking for vibrancy, clarity and crisp edges.

Here are the photos of my first go-round.

       

 

 

                  In my opinion the best performers were the dye inks from the Recollections and Memento (Tsukineko) lines. I stamped with Recollections with and without batting under the muslin and definitely got a crisper edge without the batting.

I also was pleased with the Dye Ink in the Distress Ink Line from Ranger. (That’s the one in the group to the LEFT in the upper left hand corner.)

The solvent ink from Staz-on and Archival Dye Ink from Ranger were both excellent. The downside with both is that they are limited in color choice and are quite pricey.

The pigment ink from Colorbox left a smudgy outline. I tried it on a lightly padded surface, over batting and on a hard surface. The hard surface was best but still not as distinct as the Dye Inks.

The pigment ink from Versacraft was acceptable but not as crisp as Memento.

*A note about Versacraft: it is widely accepted as a good choice for fabric stamping as it has proven to stay put after washing. So if that’s your need it’s definitely a consideration.

Further test:

I further tested the Dye Ink from Recollections with a larger stamp to see if I could repeat the good outcome. I am partial to this particular pad because of availability and lower cost. However I haven’t seen it in a wide array of colors.

I retested the Memento as well. Both were excellent. Memento has a broad choice of colors available. It’s a little pricey in the larger stamp pad but is available in a smaller more economical Dew Drop size.

And here is the Dye Ink from Ranger (Distress Ink) This comes in a wonderful array of colors.

Next I will be testing my collection of brush markers with stamps to see how they perform on fabric so stay tuned.

Please pretty please leave me a comment – especially if you have had experience with any of these and would like to add your observations. That would be grand and thank you!!

Inktense Fabric Paint Tutorial

Guila Greer:

A great tutorial for using Inktense Pencils on fabric – These are my favorite colored pencils to use.

Originally posted on Carla Barrett:

Santa brought me a large pack of Inktense pencils by Derwent, so I decided to stitch a block design using my new IQ, and then paint it.  This is a work in progress (WIP), but I thought I would share a tutorial.

What you need:

Inktense set of pencils (comes in different sized packs.  I own a 36 set and a 24 set)

Small fabric brushes (bought at Michaels.  Read the label as it will say it is used on fabric)

Stitched quilted fabric design (I used a digital design by Karen McTavish, but you could stitch a stencil or any design.)

Fabric or Textile medium- I used 2 types on the sample- Aloe Vera gel and Liquidtex Fabric Medium diluted 50/50% with water (see baby jar in photo above).  Jo Sonja also makes a fabulous medium for use on fabric, some with added sheen.  (Google “Jo Sonya” to buy…

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Making Crystal Dangle Earrings

Another great video tutorial from Joggles

Just click on the link below and leave a comment here if you enjoy it and would like to see more of these short videos.   Thanks!  Guila

Making Crystal Dangle Earrings.

Link

If you’re looking to get jump started with some Journal pages – take a look at this!

Techniques For Using Stencils In Your Art.

Another wonderful video from Barbara at Joggles

I.D./Luggage Tag – a Tutorial

Materials Needed

Cotton Fabricfor  tag -  cut 2 pieces -  4” by 6” each   (finished tag will be 3 ½ by 5 ½ “.)

              for loop attachment -  cut 1 piece         14 “ long by 1 ½ inches.

Vinyl –cut 1 piece 4 ½  by 2 ½ inches

Stabilizer – 1 piece of fusible batting or Craft Bond cut 3  ½ by 5 ½ inches.

Fabric Pieces

  1. Center batting or craft fuse on wrong side of one of fabric

    Stabilizer Fused to Fabric (1)

    rectangles – press according to package directions to fuse in place.

  2. Place fabric rectangles right sides together and stitch with 1/4 inch seam around perimeter leaving a gap of 1 and 1/2 “ in the middle of one short end.  You will use this gap to turn the tag and to insert the ends of the loop.
  3. Press loop piece in half (the long way).  Open it up and press each side toward the middle.  Then fold in half lengthways. Edge stitch both long sides.
  4. Trim corners and turn the tag inside out through the gap you left so that right side is now on the outside.
  5.   Push corners out neatly and press.  TipTime:  I have found that a wooden chopstick is helpful to poke those little corners out without going through the fabric.
  6. Insert raw ends of loop about ½ inch into the gap you left.
  7. Top stitch around perimeter of the tag. Double stitch the area where the loop is inserted to make it extra secure.
  8. Place vinyl piece in center of tag.
  9. Sew 3 sides of the vinyl using a longer stitch than normal.  I set my Pfaff at 3.0.
  10. TipTime:  If you use too short a stitch you may cause the vinyl to tear.
  11. TipTime:  the open end of the vinyl should be pointing toward the loop to make it more difficult for the ID card to slip out.
    • I bought my vinyl in the home decorating department at JoAnn’s  You’ll want one that has some body to it so that it will hold up better..
    • I made ID tag inserts using Print Shop – A regular size business card will fit nicely.

    These directions and images are the work and property of Guila Greer and may not be reproduced without permission.